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Seattle's Chinatown is still the magnet for those seeking adventure, its mysteries, dark alleys, lanterns, the chimes and weird rhythm of oriental music, the danger that is supposed to lurk for everybody; yet very disappointed as they well may be, for Chinatown is not what it used to be.

The afternoons are even gayer, oriental people, Filipinos dominating, are lazy and carefree basking in the sun...

It is modern China, modern oriental people enjoying life with ease and contentment as in any down-town metropolis.

King Street—and what a city! Her bright lights glittering compares with Broadway, neon signs, limousines and cars parked along the sidewalks, Chop Suey houses, cafes and stores packed to capacity with eager people and satisfied customers; laughing, dancing to the music of syncopated jazz.

The afternoons are even gayer, oriental people, Filipinos dominating, are lazy and carefree basking in the sun, some cooling on the corner, talking, joking, content and happy. On towards Maynard and Jackson streets the scenes are the same.

* * *

Wanted. Hop pickers, $1.50 per hundred. Scores of Paisanos on the street, silver jingles in their pockets, suits still pressed, smoking cigars or cigarettes, a broad smile on their faces and the girl friends still love them. Very few like to work.

* * *

On arrival from the cool north to find his "weakness" having embarked on another career, Vincent Rosal, Chronicle columnist is now on seclusion at a nearby farm. Wanted: A Princess Charming.

* * *

Nightly crowds are gay and heavy, with the highbrows and the lowbrows, the rich and the poor, the well dressed and the opposite mingling happily...

Rizal Cafe: Nightly crowds are gay and heavy, with the highbrows and the lowbrows, the rich and the poor, the well dressed and the opposite mingling happily, enjoying dancing to the tune of modern music, all are alike, dancing instructress[es] are mighty willing, pleasing and accomodating.

Miss Theresa Kumagai having chosen a well anticipated career is greatly missed by her legion of admirers and friends. Having gained the popular title of Princess Charming, this columnist is looking for the most populargirl.

Dean! Dean! Two girls battling over one sailor! Was it worth it? Too bad they didn't have sparring partners.

* * *

Since the boys have come back from Alaska, it's all for one and one for all. Who is to gain and who is to lose? Gambling houses or taxi dancers?

...a man in gambling can certainly lose more in fifteen minutes of gambling than in six hours of dancing provided he doesn't meet some of these vicious gold-diggers...

Arroyo, in his last article of this paper encouraged gambling and discouraged taxi dancing. I, a taxi dancer, encourage neither, but can honestly state that a man in gambling can certainly lose more in fifteen minutes of gambling than in six hours of dancing provided he doesn't meet some of these vicious gold-diggers, so to speak. All of us know that gambling is a detriment to proper sanitation whereas in the proper form of dancing we can derive relaxation of mind and a source of exercise and poise.

* * *

Who were the people who came to find and take our Manchukuo belle back to her native land and raise her properly on rice and tea, or to match her off to any wealthy Mandarin? Did the young lady say yes or no? Only three guesses.

* * *

Hear ye! This is popular month for wedding marches! Our former Princess Charming of the Rizal Club, Miss Theresa Kumagai, has become the bride of Tomeo Takayoshi, the Japanese tenor singer who used to frequent the dance hall, wooed and won the fair lady on Thursday, September twelfth. We sincerely hope she will find more happiness in being a model housewife than a light-footed nymph.

Miss Maxine Lane, another popular member of the Rizal, was married to Mr. Frank Aguilar. Oh dear! How these boys are stepping! Best of luck to all.

Who's next? Step right up boys!

* * *

Did you clean your ears good? Or if you can't see, pay a visit to your optician and have a pair of eyes made so you can listen and see the murmuring of love's sweet message between a certain young lady and a certain young man in the orchestra who plays the guitar and sings "Oh, You're a Heavenly Thing," and while he sings, take a peek at his "suppressed desire!"

Tsk, Tsk, Laura, ain't love grand!

* * *

A remark was heard from the very lips of a new member, Violet, to the effect that she was not popular. Gentlemen! Shame on you! Have you fallen on your line of duty? Don't let this little girl be disillusioned after all she heard about our dashing and rushing young men. Defend your honor, boys! Forward March!

* * *

Floor Ramblings: MISS ISABELLE FRASER...very quiet, modest, and courteous... ...DON BLAS ... a regular patron ... ALTHEA CAMPBELL and ANNE ENDRICKSON ...like to read their magazines ...JOAN SANTOS, RUTH DELA CRUZ, and AUDREY BELDIVIA ... three Portlanders enjoying beer at the counter ...VIC VELASCO ... sending a note to his weakness ... CECELIA KUMAGAI ...

going home early ... VICENTE NAVEA ... quite busy collecting DO-RE-MI from the boys ... Amen.

© Emily Angelo

Reprinted from The Philippine Advocate, 1930.

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