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two canvases
(Musee de l'Orangerie, after Monet)
by Luisa Igloria

1. Morning with Weeping Willows (1917-1926)

In the first one, we learn about
foreground: dark braids of willow

leaf falling across canvas, the almost
white weft of linen become crystalline

and therefore unrecognizable, under
a curtain now passing for glass

          This water, beyond all
          endurance—

                           singing of bled
aquarelles: an expanse of skin,
rippling light in scaled rows;

needles that the acupuncturist
swivels into each ripe indentation
on the open back—

                      clean steel,
aroma of moxa balls igniting
across a field like late fireflies

The look of risen flesh, pulsing
and epiphanic: irrepairably devoted
to the sealing of its own wounds

The beaten surface of a sheet
aroused, witness to its melting—

          its accumulated weight
stroked to a delirium of recognition

2. Clouds (1926)

And in the second, we practice
averting the gaze: the way a virtuoso plays
blindfolded in an unheated studio in the dead
of winter, the fingers all cut off a pair of gloves—
the truer furnace needing to be fed by the scored
tongues of bells ringing in a dark country, the sound
of wood split by hand, a memory of fever
and dry thirst to make the roof of the soul
smolder, a thatched hut on fire—

A phenomenology of the world
posited as the source of the image
here—in the museum guidebooks and
postcards, bearing little resemblance
to its original: narrow as a painted sash,
masses of cloud that look almost part of a floral
pattern—the hem of a dress or sarong, neatly
ripped to staunch the flow of blood

But see how this other wound remains open,
a speculum inserted where the pond water
agrees to lie, placid and as if upon a table,
then doubles back—reflecting, as the shiny
chrome in overhead lamps or mirrors
will do, at once the birth of shapes
and their rapid erasure

Only the eye, following where the hand
closes around air, retrieves what
is lost; what hovers between choice
and hesitation

© Luisa Igloria

grass | two canvases | mother liquor | jungian dream therapy

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CAMILO ANTONIO
shoppers of paradise
for so the boys rule

FERNANDO AYALA
of kings and fools
paintings

KERMIN BALAWIS
ano nga ba ang tula

CARLENE SOBRINO BONNIVIER
after the dance
child

KIMBERLY CASTRO
the spare key

JERRY GRANDEA
the rice terraces
arteries
my brothers
kiss the baby, love the baby
yin-yang plate

EVEE HUERVANA
in my net

LUISA IGLORIA
grass
two canvases
mother liquor
jungian dream therapy

PAOLO JAVIER
my hoarse poesy

SEB KOH
doubt
pain

JOSEPH LEGASPI
Visiting the Manongs in a Convalescent Home in Delano
The Red Sweater
The Sow
Three Muses

LILAC LIMPANGOG
64-square riddle

TRIFEE MIACO
Expressions in Lilies

ABIGAIL CRUZ OLIVA
samahan mo ako /
kaduaennak
(iloko version)

sa paglaya ng ibon /
iti panagwaywayas ti tumatayab
(iloko version)


JESSIE BADILLO SNYDER
precipice

IRENE SUICO SORIANO
tata dinong
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